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Indiana's 11 electoral college votes for Trump, Pence

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Indiana’s 11 state electors take an oath before casting their vote for president and vice president Monday.  - SHELBY MULLIS, THESTATEHOUSEFILE.COM
  • Shelby Mullis, TheStatehouseFile.com
  • Indiana’s 11 state electors take an oath before casting their vote for president and vice president Monday.
By Shelby Mullis

As Indiana’s 11 electors met at the Statehouse Monday to cast their official votes for Donald Trump and Mike Pence, they were greeted by protestors.

When the results were announced inside the House chamber that all 11 votes had been cast for Trump and Pence, the protestors booed outside.

None of Indiana’s electors were expected to be a “faithless elector” — an elector who does not vote for the General Election winner — but protestors wanted to make sure their opinions were known.

The first Monday following the second Wednesday of December during an election year is the day all 538 members of the electoral college meet in their respective states to cast their vote, according to the National Archives and Records Administration.

“Today is a celebration for all Hoosiers and all Americans,” said Connie Lawson, Indiana’s secretary of state. “It took months of hard work to prepare for the election and to get us to this point today.”

All 11 electors, as well as the state’s 11 alternates, were in attendance Monday. Indiana’s 11 electors represent the number of state Senators and Representatives in Congress. Indiana currently has nine U.S. representatives and two U.S. senators.

“I wanted what we did here today to be a reflection of the voters across the state of Indiana,” said Beth Boyce, an elector-alternate. “We did that job well.”
Elector Kelly Mitchell fills out her ballot Monday morning for president of the United States.  - SHELBY MULLIS, THESTATEHOUSEFILE.COM
  • Shelby Mullis, TheStatehouseFile.com
  • Elector Kelly Mitchell fills out her ballot Monday morning for president of the United States.
Boyce, who also represented Indiana’s 9th District as a delegate at the Republican National Convention, called this year “historic,” not only for herself, but for the state.

“It’s such a remarkable year we’ve had and now that our governor is going on to be vice president — it’s a very special day,” Boyce said.

But protestors like JoAnne Shank, of Bloomington, came to the Statehouse to share their disapproval as well as “show solidarity” with those feeling similar to them.

“Today is a scary day for me because I am very concerned about our future with a President Trump,” Shank said. “There were a whole bunch of people sitting in front of the room of electors and in the beginning, everyone sang patriotic songs, said prayers and it was respectful.”

When Shank heard the results, she said she was disappointed, but expected both Trump and Pence to win Indiana.

Boyce said that while she doesn’t agree with the protests’ reason, she supports everyone’s right to protest.
JoAnn Shank, of Bloomington, and her friend Jean Smith, hold signs in protest of the 2016 election results Monday.  - SHELBY MULLIS, THESTATEHOUSEFILE.COM
  • Shelby Mullis, TheStatehouseFile.com
  • JoAnn Shank, of Bloomington, and her friend Jean Smith, hold signs in protest of the 2016 election results Monday.
“A common theme has been, ‘Vote your conscience,’” Boyce said. “In this situation, the voters in the 9th District overwhelmingly supported Donald Trump, so I am voting my conscience and supporting the voters. So I think we’ve done a good job there.”

The 538 total votes will be counted in a Congressional session Jan. 6. The winning candidate must have a majority — at least 270 votes — in order to be named winner.


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