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R.I.P. Hardin, Workman and Glick

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This weekend marked the passing of several Indianapolis legends including educator and activist Rev. Boniface Hardin, jazzman Chuck Workman and philanthropist Marilyn Glick.

Readers are encouraged to post memories of these city leaders in the comments section.

Click here to read NUVO's tribute to Workman. Services are scheduled for noon Friday, March 30, at Flanner & Buchanan Washington Park North. Calling runs from 10 a.m. - noon.

Rita Kohn offered the following remembrances of Hardin and Glick:

Father Boniface Hardin

1933-2012

Father Boniface Hardin, president emeritus of Martin University, passed away on March 24.

NUVO presented Hardin with a lifetime achievement award at its Cultural Vision Awards in 2001.

Father Hardin and I shared a passion for making lifelong learning a pursuit for people of all walks of life. He built Martin University from a handful of like-minded students and a dream of touching a multitude.

A NUVO story grew out of our initial introduction.

I remember coming to his office "decorated with books" and overflowing with plans for a fruitful present and future that mediated disappointments of the past.

Over the years we met and exchanged notes about the slow but steady progress of the collective impact of Martin University. But best of all, we shared impressions of books we were reading. Along the line he reminded me to care about the stories of neighborhoods and to honor stories of individuals who support those who dream and achieve.

Father Boniface Hardin looked for ways to grow justice and equity. His was a path of caring paved with a common sense approach toward uniting and unifying people toward a common goal be it for personal betterment or civic action. A Mass for the Dead at 10 a.m. on Thursday, March 29, at Saints Peter and Paul Cathedral Church, 1347 N. Meridian St.

Marilyn Glick

1922-2012

Philanthropist Marilyn Glick, who died March 23 at age 90, was a long-time supporter of the local arts scene, donating millions — with her husband, Gene, and through the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Family Foundation — to make possible programs such as the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana Authors Award (which annually rewards prizes of up to $10,000 to winning authors), and projects such as the Glick Peace Walk, part of the Indianapolis Cultural Trail: A Legacy of Gene and Marilyn Glick.

Marilyn Glick epitomized sunshine. She stood shoulder-to-shoulder with her husband, Eugene, though her diminutive stature measured well below his large frame. "Bunny and Gene" lived the life of a shared dream, initially pooling their resources and working in concert to build a business and raise a family, both predicated on the notion that making the world a better place is what comes naturally.

I can't remember how I first met Bunny. Thirty years ago when I came to Indianapolis, I knew of Marilyn as a collector of glass art, which she shared not only in engaging displays in her warm and welcoming home, but at the Indianapolis Museum of Art for the general public to enjoy. She solicited my assistance to promote eye care for children long before she and Gene endowed the Glick Eye Institute at the Indiana University School of Medicine.

She and Gene were avid proponents of knowing our history and guiding our lives through the exemplary actions of others long before bringing the Eugene and Marilyn Glick Indiana History Center, the Indianapolis Cultural Trail and the Indiana Authors Award to fruition.

Bunny and Gene sparked dinner conversations with delightfully told stories, challenged our thinking with pointed civic concerns and always left us feeling treasured.

Hard work carried from humble beginnings not only anchored her way of life, it cloaked her actions in humility, humanity and grace. Marilyn and Gene Glick shared their income to create a better city for the public at large and in numerous quiet ways they gave their wealth of love and caring to family and friends. Marilyn's singular strengths remain with us, doubled through her abiding unity with Gene.

Memorial donations may be made to the Glick Eye Institute at I.U. School of Medicine.

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