Food + Drink » Food News

Sexier charcuterie

by

comment

Too hot to handle.
  • Courtesy Goose the Market
  • Too hot to handle.
When I first got to Indy three years ago, I opened Nuvo to read about an enchanting place that sold pb&j pate sandwiches. It was a place called Goose the Market, and it wasn’t a complete fairy tale, because it was real.

They killed off the pb&j pate before I could get there. But when Goose’s informal enoteca opens in early(ish) June, perhaps I’ll see it again.

Now, countless restaurants around the nation have used the term “enoteca” to push everything from yuppie small plates to bastardized Italian, but the term has its roots in small Italian wine stores that often sampled their drink and some food.

In her almost 10-year-old tome on the enoteca with the namesake title, food writer Joyce Goldstein helps sharpen the focus and origin of the Roman concept:





“Today, the term osteria or locanda refers to a casual establishment serving wine and food, sometimes at communal tables, usually in the countryside or in small towns. The enoteca is the urban counterpart, offering wines and sometimes food but in an even more abbreviated setting: no rooms to let, often no kitchen, and maybe a few tables.”

This is Goose’s enoteca.

Owner Chris Eley says the slightly converted downstairs will feature communal seating benches made of reclaimed wood and a makeshift bar embellished with the same material, enough to fit twenty-something people who get there first. More importantly, it will sample some of the charcuterie, olives and meatstuffs the place is known for — plus some edgier, smaller batch stuff that will only go downtstairs. And when it’s gone down there, it’s gone.

Besides the regular pig-heavy forcemeats of pates, sausages and rilletes, no small serving of good protein will be excluded. There will be fresh, crudo-style fish. And slippery, melt-in-your-mouth lardo, pure Indiana hog back fat cured in-house with truffle salt, fresh thyme, orange peel and coriander. And the moist, meaty preparation of tartare. And the slurpin’-good richness that is bone marrow. Too wash it all down, the space will feature six wines and six beers by the glass. Find something else in the retail space you’d like to open? You can do it, for what I’m told will be a miniscule (but legal!!!) corking fee.

Comments

This Week's Flyers

Around the Web