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Short sci-fi film at Big Car Gallery

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The great irony of anti-technology films is that they would not be possible without that very technology. In making these films, directors become slaves to computers, cell phones, etc. However, this is a good thing because it proves their point that raging against the machine is indeed impossible.

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The latest film to simultaneously embrace technology and stand against it is the short film, Kick. It follows two women who grow a strong bond out of their mutual "technophobia". They don't use cars, cell phones or computers. As they seek psychological treatment and their relationship grows deeper, the film spins into a sci-fi world unlike any you've seen before.

The women in the film may not use technology but the filmmaker certainly does. Directed by Chicago-based experimental filmmaker, Clara Alcott, Kick has a Facebook page (www.facebook.com/kickthemovie) and a trailer available online (http://vimeo.com/8199065).

The film is far more than a message movie. It's a cinematic hall of mirrors, blending the Technicolor spirit of 1950s melodramas with the surreal wonder of B-horror films. And that's what I gleaned from the trailer alone. I can't wait to see the film in its entirety.

You can see Kick on Friday, June 11 (9 p.m.) at the Big Car Gallery (1043 Virginia Ave. Suite 215) for $5. It will be proceeded by a short film program of works that reflect its themes.

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